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48510 Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Engineering: Electrical and Data Engineering
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Description

The subject material is organised around two modules.

In Module 1 (The Basics) basic electrical concepts such as voltage, current, resistance and power are introduced; simple circuit analysis techniques for DC and AC circuits are studied; and an analysis of the types, properties and functions of components commonly found in a linear DC power supply is used as an application of this basic knowledge. The practical aspects of this module include learning how to use basic equipment such as a multimeter and digital storage oscilloscope (DSO), learning some simple 'tinkering' skills, and building and testing of simple circuits.

In Module 2 (Signals in Electrical Engineering) an application called the Filter Challenge is used to provide a context for presentation of material related to time and frequency domain representation of electrical signals including Bode plots and simple first-order RC filters.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Use basic equipment such as a multimeter and digital storage oscilloscope (DSO)
2. Use some simple 'tinkering' skills, and building and testing of simple circuits.
3. Appreciate general application of electrical engineering concepts in daily life
4. Apply fundamental mathematical concepts to problems related to basic electrical circuits
5. Recognise, define and correctly use basic electrical technical terms such as voltage, current, power, phase, impedence, reactance, filtering, etc.
6. Recognise fundamental design principles of electrical circuits and be able to use in solving simple design problems incorporating a range of concepts
7. Demonstrate competence in using basic laboratory equipment and soldering skills
8. Use basic AC and DC circuit analysis laws and methods

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following faculty Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs) and Engineers Australia (EA) Stage 1 competencies:

  • Identify and apply relevant problem-solving methodologies, which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competencies: 1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 (B.1)
  • Design components, systems and/or processes to meet required specifications, which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competencies: 1.3, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 (B.2)
  • Implement and test solutions, which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competencies: 2.2, 2.3 (B.5)
  • Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation, which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competencies: 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2 (C.1)
  • Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices, which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competencies: 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 (C.2)
  • Evaluate model applicability, accuracy and limitations, which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competencies: 2.1, 2.2 (C.3)
  • Reflect on personal and professional experience to engage independent development beyond formal education for lifelong learning, which is linked to EA Stage 1 Competencies: 3.3, 3.5 (D.2)

Teaching and learning strategies

Student learning is enhanced by attending 1 hour of lectures per week, 2 hours of tutorials and participation in 3 hours of laboratory work per week.

In addition to this, an average student is expected to spend 3-4 hours per week in activities which will support their learning. This may include reading the textbook and lecture notes and self-study materials, attempting tutorial problems, practice using the laboratory equipment, and preparing for the assessment items.

As an indication, this subject would normally assume a total time commitment (including class time) of approximately 120 hours, for an average student aiming to pass the subject. This means 10 hours per week for the 12 week semester plus study for the final exam.

Early Online Feedback Quiz (Compulsory)

A compulsory early online feedback quiz must be taken by all the enrolled students in Week 3. This quiz is a short online multiple choice quiz. The quiz covers the study material related to topic 1. The aim of this quiz is to provide early feedback on learning progress in this subject. This quiz does not carry any marks.

Lectures (weekly details are provided in the Learning Guide)
Lectures (1 hour each week) are formatted to help emphasise key learning outcomes from the weekly topic material. Most lecture sessions include examples of applications of the material presented, as well as demonstrations of practical work that students are expected to undertake during the laboratory sessions.

All important announcements are made at the lecture sessions and placed in the “Announcements” section of the UTSOnline site.
Students should read the prescribed text to obtain a deeper understanding of the concepts/material presented in the lectures.

Tutorials (weekly details are provided in the Learning Guide)
Each student must attend a 2 hour tutorial each week. Attendance at tutorials is strongly recommended.

Tutorials are an opportunity for students to apply some of the material presented in lectures and to ask questions about problems or concepts they have difficulties with. After attending the lectures and reading the relevant sections from the prescribed textbook. Students should attempt the recommended problems from the textbook and any other relevant problems prior to attending the tutorial.
This requires a commitment from students to work before coming to a tutorial as well as staying focussed during the tutorial time to attempt and solve some of the problems.

Students should use the worked examples in the textbook to provide a model for the type of approach needed to solve a problem. Their tutors may also work through some selected problems to emphasise the sort of thinking that would help students to solve a problem.

Laboratories (weekly details are provided in the Learning Guide)

There is a strong emphasis in this subject on laboratory work with half of the contact time being spent in the laboratory. Attending and completing all laboratory tasks within the prescribed time is strongly recommended. Check Minimum Requirements.

• The Laboratory tasks include 6 laboratory practice sessions, 2 laboratory practical tests and 6 online lab quizzes. Before attending each weekly lab practice session, students need to complete all preparatory work and after completing the experiments, students are required to enter all the results and analysis in the Laboratory Resource Book.

The laboratory practical sessions are designed to be utilised for a duration of 3 hours each. Students are expected to arrive within 15 minutes of the lab start time so that they are in the best position to gain full credit.

At the completion of each lab session, a lab supervisor will check students' Laboratory Resource Book to verify participation. It is student’s responsibility to ensure that the lab report within the Laboratory Resource Book at the end of each session is signed and marked by a lab supervisor, which also forms the record of lab attendance. If the lab work completed by the students is either unsatisfactory or incomplete, then they will be awarded only partial credit for that particular laboratory session. Feedback on the quality of the laboratory work will be provided by the lab supervisor.

• Only Laboratory Resource Books will be signed.

• Students must purchase the component kit much before entering the first laboratory. Every student must bring his/her component kit for all the labs to perform measurements. The kit is available only from M/s JayCar Electronics, 129 York St, Sydney CBD. (See further details on UTSOnline). The cost of the component kit is approximately $35.

• Read the Laboratory Resource Book before coming to the class. This is important because some of the laboratories require students to bring additional material to the laboratory or do calculations etc. prior to the lab. Labs will help students to acquire competence with electrical measurements and use of common measuring equipment.

• Bring the lab component kit and other required materials for each lab session. Turning up to the lab without the lab component kit and/or Laboratory Resource Book will make it difficult for students to complete the labs.

• Students will be expected to work in pairs in the lab using the workstation allocated to them and groups of three or more students will not be allowed.

• Practical competence will be assessed during two Laboratory Practical Tests. During the weekly laboratory sessions, students are expected to develop skills in the use of the equipment and to demonstrate a minimum level of competence. Development of these skills will be necessary for future subjects and may also be useful in the industry experience.

Content (topics)

  • Basic concepts such voltage, current, power, and energy and use of these concepts in simple resistive circuits.
  • Simple circuit analysis laws, e.g. Kirchhoff’s Current and Voltage Law.
  • Simple resistive DC and AC circuits analysis, e.g. Node-Voltage Analysis, Mesh-Current Analysis.
  • Circuit analysis techniques, e.g. Thévenin and Norton equivalent circuits, Superposition principle.
  • Principles of operation of capacitors, inductors in a simple AC circuit. Basic concepts of First order RC circuits and steady state sinusoidal analysis.
  • Introduction to Transformer, Diodes, and Operation of half and full wave rectifier circuit.
  • Basic concepts in AC circuit theory, phasor concepts.
  • Basic complex number concepts.
  • Circuit analysis with phasors and complex impedances.
  • Basic concepts in Frequency Response and Bode Plots.
  • Introduction to Filter design.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Laboratory Assessments

Intent:

To help students aquire basic hands-on electrical laboratory skills, competence to work with electrical measurement equipment and to understand the underlying concepts taught in classes.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7 and 8

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, B.2, B.5, C.1 and C.3

Type: Laboratory/practical
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Length:

6 Laboratory practice sessions, each lab is 3 hours per week.

2 practical lab tests, these are 45 minutes each. Test 1 covering Labs 1-3. Test 2 covering Labs 4-6.

6 Online lab quizzes, each quiz length is 60 minutes. These quizzes will be launched via UTSOnline.

Opportunity for hands-on practical skills development is provided to all students in scheduled laboratory times with allocated tutors. Students are expected to attend all scheduled laboratory sessions to develop the necessary skills which underpin threshold knowledge on this subject.

Please note, further details will be communicated to students during classes, labs and via UTSOnline.

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Lab hands-on training and practical tests 70 1, 2, 3, 7 B.2, B.5, C.3
Online lab concept quizzes 30 5, 6, 8 B.1, B.2, C.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Class Test

Intent:

Provide timely feedback on student understanding of the basic mathematical and circuit design concepts covered in all classes.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

4, 5, 6 and 8

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, B.2, B.5, C.1, C.2 and C.3

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%
Length:

A 60 minute test conducted during the tutorial session.

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Understanding of concepts 30 4, 5 C.1, C.3
Accuracy of calculations 30 4, 5, 6, 8 B.1, B.2, C.1, C.2
Use of mathematical models 40 4, 5, 6, 8 B.1, B.2, B.5, C.1, C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Final Examination

Intent:

The final exam aims to test students' understanding on the use of concepts learned in the lectures and tutorials throughout the session.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

4, 5, 6 and 8

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, B.2, C.1, C.2 and D.2

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 45%
Length:

This Centrally Conducted Formal Final Examination (2 hrs) will be scheduled by the University during the formal examination period.

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Understanding of concepts 35 4, 5 C.1, D.2
Accuracy of calculations 30 4, 5, 6, 8 B.1, B.2, C.1, C.2
Use of mathematical models 35 4, 5, 6, 8 B.1, B.2, C.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

In order to pass the subject, a student must achieve an overall mark of 50% or more.

Required texts

Essential notes are available on UTSOnline. It is important that you bring these notes to ALL classes for this subject.
These notes will include:

  • Learning Guide
  • Laboratory Resource Book

TextBook

Hambley, A. R. Electrical Engineering: Principles & Applications, Global Edition eBook (7e). Pearson Australia. This book is also a prescribed text for the subject 48520 Electronics and Circuits. It is available from the following link in Digital and/or Print.

http://www.pearson.com.au/9781292223209

Other resources

U:PASS

UTS Peer Assisted Study Success is a voluntary “study session” where you will be studying the subject with other students in a group. It is led by a student who has previously achieved a distinction or high distinction in the subject area, and who has a good WAM. Leaders will prepare activities for you to work on in groups based on the content you are learning in lectures and tutorials. It’s really relaxed, friendly, and informal. Because the leader is a student just like you, they understand what it’s like to study the subject and how to do well, and they can pass those tips along to you. Students also say it’s a great way to meet new people and a “guaranteed study hour”.

You can sign up for U:PASS sessions via U:PASS website http://tinyurl.com/upass2017 Note that sign up is not open until week 2, as it’s voluntary and only students who want to go should sign up.

If you have any questions or concerns about U:PASS, please contact Georgina at upass@uts.edu.au, or check out the website.