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21068 Negotiations: Theory and Practice

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Business
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level: Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

Negotiation is a critical skill needed for effective management. This subject is designed to provide a foundation in negotiation theory and practice. The primary objective of the subject is to develop interpersonal, analytical, and communication skills through negotiation simulations, case studies, lectures and class discussions. A variety of settings, media, and contexts are utilised to explore the psychology of bargaining and negotiation, and the dynamics of interpersonal and intergroup conflict and its resolution.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
1. Explain from a critical perspective the core concepts in the scholarly literature on negotiation strategies and styles, behaviours, processes, and methods of dispute resolution
2. Explain the significance of negotiation in the workplace and the changing character of negotiation in Australian industrial relations
3. Describe the key components of how to prepare for a negotiation and the tools available for use when negotiating
4. Demonstrate a personal, yet adaptive approach to negotiation preparation, execution, and reflect on this development

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

This subject is designed to provide a thorough grounding in negotiation theory and practice. The primary objective of this subject is to develop a student’s interpersonal, analytical, and communication skills through negotiation simulations, case studies, lecture, and class discussions. A variety of settings, media, and contexts will be utilized in this subject, reflecting the various situations in which negotiations take place in personal and professional spheres.

This subject contributes to developing the following graduate attributes:

  • Attitudes and values

This subject also contributes specifically to introduce the following Program Learning Objectives:

  • 4.1 Demonstrate awareness of conflicting ethical demands of various stakeholders within relevant professional contexts - including Indigenous contexts
  • 4.2 Evaluate business responses to ethical issues and dilemmas

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject is presented in seminar format. Essential principles are presented and analysed and students are lead through practical application exercises.

Content (topics)

  • Introduction to negotiation
  • Goals & BATNA
  • Overall negotiation approach & five styles
  • Integrative negotiation & getting to yes
  • Distributive negotiation & getting past no
  • Frames & tactics
  • Perception & persuasion
  • National culture & global negotiations
  • Challenges & ethics in negotiation

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Quizzes (Individual)

Objective(s):

This addresses subject learning objective(s):

1 and 2

Weight: 40%
Length:

The time frame will be announced as quiz released via UTSOnline.

Assessment task 2: Negotiation Scenario (Group)

Objective(s):

This addresses subject learning objective(s):

2, 3 and 4

Weight: 30%

Assessment task 3: In-Class Test (Individual)

Objective(s):

This addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3 and 4

Weight: 30%

Minimum requirements

Students must achieve at least 50% of the subject’s total marks.

Required texts

Lewicki, R.J., Barry, B. and Saunders, D.M. (2016) Essentials of Negotiation (6th Ed), McGraw-Hill/Irwin, New York. ISBN: 978-0-07-7862466

Lewicki, R.J., Barry, B. and Saunders, D.M.(2015) Negotiation:Readings. Exercises and Cases, McGraw-Hill, New York. ISBN: 978-0-07-786242-8

References

  1. Adair, W.L., Brett, J., Lempereur, A., Okumura, T., Shikhirev, P., Tinsley, C. and Lytle, A. (2004) Culture and negotiation strategy, Negotiation Journal, Vol. 20, Issue 1, pp. 87-111.
  2. Asherman, I.G. (2012) Negotiation at Work: Maximize your team’s skills with 60 high-impact activities, McGraw-Hill, USA. ISBN: 0814431909
  3. Coltri, L.S. (2010) Alternative Dispute Resolution, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs
  4. Fell, R. (2012) Effective Negotiation: From Research to Results, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne. ISBN: 9781107605381
  5. Lewicki, R.J., Barry, B. and Saunders, D.M. (2010) Negotiation (6th Ed), McGraw-Hill/Irwin, New York. ISBN: 0073381209