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21060 Advocacy and Social Change

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Business
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level: Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject explores the theoretical framework related to advocacy and activism as the basis for engaging in practical advocacy activities. The main focus of the subject is to engage students in a specific project to assist Indigenous organisational settings. This involves identifying an organisation where there is a clear need for the development of advocacy and communication strategies. Students develop a tailored advocacy strategy including consideration of appropriate tactics and development, and application of advocacy and communication skills. Ultimately, this subject locates activists through their shared experiences and explores strategies for effective advocacy.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
1. Devise a strategic approach to advocacy and campaigning in third sector organisational development
2. Demonstrate awareness of the strengths and weaknesses of advocacy planning and apply that awareness in the analysis of an organisationís advocacy plan
3. Communicate effectively in person and in writing to a wide variety of stakeholders
4. Demonstrate effective communication, advocacy and analytical and intervention and interpersonal skills
5. Locate, critically analyse and explain critical issues facing Indigenous organizational settings in Australia

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following program learning objectives:

  • Critically reflect on the contributions and perspectives of Indigenous people within Australian society and apply that understanding to management (2.4)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

This subject helps the student develop the knowledge and skills necessary to participate effectively in advocacy and activism activities on behalf of a particular group or organisation. It contributes to the course learning outcomes in terms of providing transferable skills in the areas of communication, analysis and advocacy. It also helps develop a range of interpersonal skills which will support the student in engaging with a variety of stakeholders in the context of Indigenous organisations. The assessment tasks in this subject engage the student in practical application of this knowledge and skills and the development of a strategic approach to advocacy.

This subject contributes to developing the following graduate attribute:

  • Critical thinking, creativity and analytical skills

This subject also contributes specifically to develop the following Program Learning Objective:

  • 2.3: Apply critical and creative thinking to address issues in business

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject is presented in seminar format. Essential principles are presented and analysed and students are lead through practical application exercises.

Content (topics)

  • Indigenous organisations and social and political change (including theories as they relate to civil society and collective action)
  • Theory and practice of strategic communication for Indigenous organisations
  • Advocacy strategies and campaigning (including examination of case studies of successful campaigns)
  • The relationship between government funding and capacity to advocate
  • The relationship between individual and systemic advocacy, and
  • Institutional and non-institutional forms of advocacy in the Indigenous rights movement.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Short Essay (Individual)

Objective(s):

This addresses subject learning objective(s):

3 and 4

Weight: 30%
Length:

1000 Word Essay to be completed in class – can be hand written (if legible) or typed in 12 pt font with 1.5 para spacing supplied to lecturer at the end of the day.

Criteria:
  1. Critical analysis and review: this includes identification and analysis of different forms of advocacy, and persuasion, the nature of audiences potentially addressed, the significance of the forms of advocacy that might be employed when engaged in advocacy as an individual as an advocate for an organisation or when advocating within an organisation and differences between (for example) formal and informal advocacy and the effects of external factors (e.g. the need to attract private or government funding for a cause) (15%)
  2. Essay structure: e.g a clear and appropriate structure. The important factor here is not so much whether you can recall a list of subjects discussed but to demonstrate what you have learned about those subjects – which do see as being most significant and in what circumstances, and which do you see as being less significant or not relevant in some contexts? (10%)
  3. Clear written expression that is appropriate to the audience (i.e. an academically persuasive essay written for a management audience) with correct grammar, a professional and authoritative tone which is concise and readable (5%)

Assessment task 2: Presentation (individual)

Objective(s):

This addresses subject learning objective(s):

3 and 4

This addresses program learning objectives(s):

2.4

Weight: 30%
Length:

10-15 minute presentation

Criteria:
  1. Critical analysis and review: this includes identification and analysis of the issue – why it is important, why it is important to you, why it should be important to others; what has been done if anything about it, and why that has not worked. What alternatives there are, what your proposals might cost and why the expense (in money or effort) might be justified. (10%)
  2. Presentation structure: e.g. if using slides or other visual materials, an appropriate structure, headings, a legible presentation (5%)
  3. Evidence of having taken into account the views formed by the group in collaboration – whether or not you agree with those views (dissenting views are quite appropriate but you must seek to justify your position) (5%)
  4. Delivery style (10%)

Assessment task 3: Assignment (Individual)

Objective(s):

This addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3 and 5

Weight: 40%
Length:

2000 words

Criteria:
  1. Critical analysis and review: this requires establishing distinct familiarity with the issues surrounding the subject matter. It involves analysis of the system of operation, the arguments put forward in favour of current proposals and systems of evaluation that are in place. It requires a systematic critical evaluation of each aspect of the operation. It also requires devising a campaign around the subject – whether for, or against proposals for implementation or expansion, ascertaining the audience that you seek to attract to support your point of view, how you intend to win them over and how to ascertain if you are making progress towards that aim (15%)
  2. Report structure: e.g. a clear and appropriate report structure. The important factor here is not so much whether you can recall a list of subjects discussed but to demonstrate what you have learned about those subjects – which do see as being most significant and in what circumstances, and which do you see as being less significant or not relevant in some contexts? (10%)
  3. Clear written expression that is appropriate to the audience (i.e. an academically persuasive report written for a management audience) with correct grammar, a professional and authoritative tone which is concise and readable (10%)
  4. Evidence of appropriate consideration and evaluation of the collaborative group research (5%)

Minimum requirements

Students must achieve at least 50% of the subject’s total marks.

References

  1. Behrendt, L (2004) ‘Law stories and life stories: Aboriginal women, the law and Australian Society’ 2004 Clare Burton Memorial Lecture in Australian Feminist Studies vol.20, no.47, July 2005, SA: University of Adelaide
  2. Bennett, B. and Zubrzycki (2003) ‘Hearing the stories of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social workers: Challenging and educating the system’ in Australian Social Work March 2003, vol.56, no.1, Canberra: Australian Association of Social Workers
  3. Bennett, T. and Carter, D. (eds.) (2001) Culture in Australia: Policies, publics and programs Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
  4. Duelke, Britta (2005) ‘Knowing tradition, dealing with history?: On concepts, strategies and practices’ in Taylor, L., Ward, G., Henderson, G., Davis, R., and Wallis, L. (eds.) (2005) The power of knowledge: The resonance of tradition Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press
  5. Hocking, B. (ed.) (2005) Unfinished Constitutional Business? Rethinking Indigenous self-determination: Aboriginal Studies Press
  6. A range of materials will be supplied either in class or on UTS Online which will include website references the significance of which will be discussed in class.