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11291 Freehand Illustration

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Description

This subject focuses on practical experience in freehand drawing, with emphasis placed on pencil as medium. The intent is to develop the relationship between what we see and how we graphically present these images. The lessons focus on a range of subject matter, including still life, but with an emphasis on architectural form and space. There is a session of life drawing which is a valuable class for investigating various sketching and sighting techniques. Techniques for sketching as well as more formally-finished rendering are covered.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Develop skills in using sighting techniques and understanding visual cues to more accurately capture proportions and spatial relationships for a variety of subject matter.
2. Develop skills in various sketching and rendering techniques, to effectively capture and portray still life arrangements and studies of the built environment.
3. Comprehend and investigate a variety of compositional concepts to compose images that successfully represent the intent of the student, that is, to communicate their perceptions and interpretations.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Creative synthesis of complex ideas, arguments and rationales that address an array of social, technical and environmental practices (I.2)
  • Test technique-led architectural design processes against a range of architectural concerns (P.1)

Teaching and learning strategies

The class is structured so that the fundamental lessons are covered in the first half of the semester with still life subject matter, to be further extended with architectural subject matter. In each class, lectures are presented which are supported by visual slides showing a diverse range of precedent images, interspersed with a variety of exercises relevant to those specific concepts and lessons. These lectures are then uploaded to UTS Online for the student to have access to during the week to attempt and complete homework. During class time at the completion of selected exercises, students will informally share their work with the class so that students can gain insight into alternative approaches and styles. It is expected that students undertake and complete homework throughout the semester, as the most effective and speedy way to improve drawing skills is to draw often and with intent. Verbal feedback is provided during the exercises in each class; written feedback accompanies the grades for each formal submission. For the final submission (Assessment 3), during class in the week prior to submission, students will informally present their drawings-in-progress to receive verbal feedback for the opportunity to most effectively complete the drawings. Criteria is set for each assessment so that regardless of the drawing skills each student brings to the class, the various drawing concepts can be demonstrated with confidence.

Content (topics)

The content of this subject includes a series of in-class exercises relevant to each week’s subject matter. The homework set for specific weeks will aid the student to develop and extend skills that can directly relate to submissions. Prior to selected lectures/classes, there will be recommended readings and/or exercises set that will prepare the student for those classes, although all required learning will be presented, discussed and attempted during class time. The lecturer will communicate with the students during the class and via email and UTS Online regarding these preparatory exercises.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Rendering Still Life

Intent:

This assessment aims to focus the student on using skills of observation and technique. Multiple drawings are required so that a variety of skills that have been discussed in class can be employed in creating formally-finished drawings. The study and recording of still life is important for recognising and interpreting visual and physical relationships (tone, texture, dimension, shape, proportion) which are also fundamental aspects of the built environment and architectural design.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 3

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

.3

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Quality of finish formally finished drawings, high quality presentation 15 2 .3
Skills of observation - satisfactory capture of proportions and relationships of forms; minimisation of unintentional distortions; accuracy of subject's detail drawn from observation rather than knowledge 15 1 .3
Use of lines, relationship of line to tone - quality of line: economy, consistency, appropriate line weight 10 2 .3
Depth Cues - effective use of primary depth cues to represent a variety of spatial relationships and spatial depths 15 1 .3
Effective portrayal of the illusion of light - use of tone-mapping technique; effective tonal range and key; quality and consistency of hatch; effective modelling of volume 15 2 .3
Effective portrayal of texture - quality and consistency of tone hatch to represent a variety of surface qualities 15 2 .3
Composition, atmosphere of drawing - successful figure-ground relationships; treatment of surrounding negative spaces; placement of image on page; overall sense of harmony. Character, mood, emotive qualities should be considered and reflect your intent. 15 3 .3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Sketching Built Environment

Intent:

This assessment involves observation, interpretation and recording of the built environment. Observational sketching is an important skill for students to hone so that the relationships of architectural and urban elements may be studied, understood, interpreted and recorded. This will build the student’s visual vocabulary of architecture, more so than just relying on photography. Sketching requires a concentration that will also build strong connections between hand, eye and mind, further developing fundamental skills beneficial for creative architectural design. Outdoor sketching is important for understanding and employing perception of 2- and 3-dimensional form.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 3

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

.3 and P.1

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Sketch-quality, response to required range of themes in minimum 6 sketches 15 2 .3
Skills of observation and accurate capture of proportions 15 1 .3
Quality of lines, relationship of line to tone 10 2 .3
Representation of spatial depth using various depth cues, including linear perspective 15 1 .3
Effective portrayal of the illusion of light and texture 15 2 .3
Correctly placed emphasis on built environment, strong character of scene 15 2 P.1
Composition, atmosphere of drawing 15 3 .3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Rendering Built Environment, Submission of Journal

Intent:

This assessment builds on the skills discussed and practiced in the previous assessments. Additional complexities are brought to the process of drawing the built environment, including tonal rendering, multiple depth cues, and understanding of composition to bring a greater awareness of personal expression and persuasion. These drawings should be of presentation quality.

In addition, it is expected each student will start and continue with a visual diary specific to this subject. This visual diary/journal can provide an opportunity to develop and make progress on those concepts introduced in class, as well as finding particular interests (eg: subject matter, techniques, precedents) specific to each student. As Paul Laseau (architect, drawing teacher, author) says, “There are two important conditions to keep in mind when trying to develop any skill: skill comes with repetition; the surest way to practice any skill is to enjoy what you are doing” (Graphic Thinking for Architects and Designers).

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 3

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

.3, I.2 and P.1

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Quality of render; response to required themes; and relationship between drawings 10 2 .3
Skills of observation and accurate capture of proportions 10 1 .3
Quality of lines, relationship of line to tone 10 2 .3
Representation of spatial depth using various depth cues, including linear perspective 10 1 .3
Effective portrayal of the illusion of light and texture 10 2 .3
Correctly placed emphasis on the built environment, strong character of scene 10 2 P.1
Composition, atmosphere of drawing 10 3 .3
Use of exploratory sketches to plan and develop the images 10 2 I.2
Journal: Quality of work overall response to specific intentions of lessons and exercises 10 3 .3
Journal: Quantity of class exercises inclusion of class exercises 5 3 .3
Journal: Quantity of homework inclusion of work completed outside of class time, in relation to specific lessons. This applies to those weeks where assessment drawings were not being worked on. 5 3 .3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

Attendance in class, completion of class exercises and homework, submission of assessments on time.

Recommended texts

Ching, F. Design Drawing John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1998

A full bibliography of reference texts and sources used within the lecture series will be made available on UTS Online at the start of semester. Additional recommended texts include:

Barber, B. “The Fundamentals of Drawing”. Arcturus Publishing Ltd, London, 2002

Ching, F. “Architectural Graphics”. John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2003

Civardi, G. “Drawing: A Complete Guide”. Search Press, Kent 2009

Dodson, B. “Keys to Drawing”. North Light Publishing, Ohio, 1985

Lauer, D. “Design Basics”. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Saunders College Publishing, New York, 1990

Simblet, S. “The Drawing Book”. Dorling Kindersley, London 2009

Wallschlaeger, C. and Busic-Snyder, C. “Basic Visual Concepts and Principles for Artists, Architects and Designers”. WCB Publishers, Dubuque USA, 1992

Wang, T. “Pencil Sketching”. Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York, 2002