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11186 Infrastructure

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level: Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

The subject addresses the relationship of infrastructures, whether physical or invisible, to the landscape planning and spatial design. The concept of landscape as infrastructure is explored through the mapping of other key infrastructures and their interaction. Beginning with the tangible and visually dominant infrastructures such as transportation, the power grid and surface water network, the subject progresses through the study of the underground, airborne and intangible infrastructures that nevertheless shape patterns of habitation and land use.

Through the mapping and contextualisation of other key forms of infrastructure, both conventional and invisible, students identify areas of exchange and conflict with landscape infrastructures.

This subject complements 11181 Landscape Architecture Studio 5: Infrastructures.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Demonstrate the ability to research and source spatial data and information.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical appearance of various infrastructures in the landscape and their evolution.
3. Describe and argue the nature of various infrastructures, and their role within the landscape.
4. Account for and critique infrastructural and Landscape Infrastructural projects from the perspective of their design process, spatial, physical and technical characteristics, performance and impacts.
5. Proficiency in the interpretation and visualisation of spatial data. Produce effective and engaging communications on the subject of Landscape Infrastructure, in visual, oral and written forms.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Apply an informed, ethical position towards social, technical and environmental issues and practices. (A.1)
  • Work cooperatively and productively as part of a team. (C.1)
  • Advance ideas through an exploratory and iterative design process. (I.2)
  • Develop advanced skills for the production, presentation and documentation of work. (P.1)
  • Generate solutions to complex problems through an exploratory and iterative design process. (P.2)
  • Define and apply appropriate design research methods. (R.1)

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject is structured around a series of seminars. Seminars involve open discussion on a pre-defined topic. Guided by the leadership and support of the subject's coordinator, students are expected to engage constructively and generously with each seminar, sharing information and ideas, asking questions of staff and students, and advancing discussion on the topic at hand.

The subject is designed around the progressive development of assessment tasks. The weekly seminars will support the devlopment of a each assessment's practical and intellectual standing. Work in both a completed and developmental form will often form the basis of a seminar's discussions. Therefore, the quality of a seminar is dependant on the quality of work brought to class. Students, on occassion, will also be expected to prepare for class by completing assigned readings.

Students should use the discussions had in class to further their work, treating discussion as a form of formative feedback. Notes should be taken throughout each seminar, accounting for the remarks of teaching staff and fellow students. Students are to critically respond to this in the process of furthering their work. Summative feedback will be provided following the submission and/or presentation of an assessment item.

Content (topics)

  1. Infrastructural Landscapes: the cultural characterisation of landscape as conduit for infrastructures, and infrastructural dominance.
  2. Landscape as infrastructure: the structural role of landscape, and the manner in which landscape forms distinct infrastructures.
  3. Navigating Infrastructures: the understanding and cartography of infrastructures, their data and complexities.
  4. Scaling infrastructures: understanding the role of infrastructure scale within landscapes, and seeing the landscape through its data and performance.
  5. Developing Landscape Infrastructure: how a deeper understanding of infrastructures inform landscape infrastructural discourse.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: DETECTING INFRASTRUCTURES

Intent:

In this assessment task students shall be separated into groups and individual sub-themes, generating a catalogue of infrastructures, each addressing a typology of visible or physical infrastructure in the landscape. A thorough and objective research technique shall be balanced with a critical investigation of the impact on spatial design and use.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.2, P.1, P.2 and R.1

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Research tasks clearly resolved 15 1 R.1
Interpretation and synthesis of research 15 2 P.1
Demonstrate a critical, evidence based understanding of infrastructural systems 20 3 I.2
Map the function and performance of infrastructures and relationship to landscape 20 4 P.2
Visualisation and communication of infrastructural systems 30 5 P.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: INFRASTRUCTURES WORKSHOP

Intent:

In this assessment students will interact directly with the 11181 Landscape Architecture Studio 5: Infrastructures course, with a focus on surface and sub-surface water infrastructures.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

3, 4 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, I.2 and P.1

Type: Case study
Groupwork: Group, group assessed
Weight: 10%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Successful negotiation in a group task 30 3 C.1
Create a compelling spatial model and argumentation 30 4 I.2
Spatial and appropriate modeling and repreentatino of conpect in sketch, diagram and model form 40 5 P.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: INVISIBLE INFRASTRUCTURES + OVERLAY

Intent:

In this assessment task students will research, analyse and interpret specific themes in relation to the invisible and informal infrastructures identified on site. Developed at two scales, this research will identify and reflect on the interaction on other key infrastructures, landscape impact and design potential. The last week will focus on communication and presentation of the semester findings.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, I.2, P.1, P.2 and R.1

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 60%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Sourcing data sources, reports and spatial information 10 1 R.1
Map the historical development of the infrastructure in its spatial context 10 2 A.1
Determine the spatial impact of immaterial infrastructures 20 3 I.2
Implications on spatial use and on spatial form and design 30 4 P.2
Representation and publication of research findings 30 5 P.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Required texts

Essential readings will provided via the UTS Library Digital Readings Resources. Some additional essential materials may be provided via UTS Online under Resources.

Recommended texts

Additional materials, including readings, online training and information will be provided via UTS Online under Resources.