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11177 Botany

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level: Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject introduces students to botany for landscape architects. Students learn how to identify, observe and document a range of plant species, and develop a position and design approach in relation to contemporary and emerging discourses on planting design. The subject is designed to develop a wonder for plants and their expressive, ecological and cultural capacities for designing an enriched landscape as well as develop technical know-how for successful planting design.

The subject includes site visits to nurseries to understand propagation, selection and ordering; contemporary landscape projects; and national parks and botanical gardens. Lectures and in-class discussions and workshops complement the visits and are an opportunity to discuss and further each student's ideas and design.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Employ plants as a spatial and ecological medium, addressing the expressive, cultural and performative capacities of vegetation.
2. Demonstrate a theoretical position and planting design approach relative to contemporary and emerging discourses on ecology and planting design.
3. Develop ways of seeing observing and documenting plants and plant communities through a range of media and develop drawing techniques for planting design. Curation and communication of work.
4. Formulate industry specific planting plans that could be used to prepare sites, order stock and/or to be used by landscape contractors to vegetate a site.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Apply an informed, ethical position towards social, technical and environmental issues and practices. (A.1)
  • Create designs that respond to their context in formally or conceptually innovative ways. (I.1)
  • Advance ideas through an exploratory and iterative design process. (I.2)
  • Develop advanced skills for the production, presentation and documentation of work. (P.1)

Teaching and learning strategies

DIVERSE LEARNING MEANS:

The subject is structured around several modes of delivery including a master class series of illustrated lectures with experts from the field coupled with workshops and discussions, group and individual site visits with practical exercises. Assignment submissions will include verbal presentation and folios for the 2 assignments. Feedback will be verbal throughout the semester, it is the student's responsibility to make notes of any feedback given in these sessions. Supplemental written feedback will also be provided for each of the 2 assignments with the assessment.

ONLINE COURSE WORK:
Alongside the lectures and tutorials, some of the learning strategy involves online engagement. The readings will be hosted on UTSOnline. The students will find online media content, readings and discussions with tutors and peers will run outside of class hours.

FEEDBACK:

The class structure provides several opportunities for feedback:

1. All assignments are graded in ReView where the tutor(s) will give formal feedback and indicative grades. This site also allows students to self-assess.

2. Verbal feedback is provided by tutor(s) and peer-peer in the tutorial and workshop sessions for in-class presentations and work sessions.

3. The online forum will allow students to engage with the work of their peers and the tutor(s) and can be seen as a further opportunity for informal feedback.

Content (topics)

Plant identification, drawing plants, selecting and designing with plants.

Plants and their expressive, ecological and cultural capacities for an enriched city and environment.

Industry specific planting plans, soil preparation standards.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Plant portfolio

Intent:

The aim of the assessment is to build ways of observing, identifying, researching and documenting plants and plant communities, and to develop a theoretical position and approach to planting design.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, I.1, I.2 and P.1

Type: Portfolio
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Planting design initial development 20 1 I.1
Quality of an initial theoretical position and design approach 20 2 I.2
Quality of documentation through various media and layout and curation of folio 40 3 P.1
evidence of ecological/technical/cultural research with in depth research and supported by breadth of plant research 20 4 A.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Planting design and documentation

Intent:

The aim of the assessment is to continue developing and refining design approach and techniques, expanding plant palette and deploying this on a site to then develop a refined industry-specific planting plan and documentation that communicates design intent.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, I.1, I.2 and P.1

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Development and refinement of planting design through iterative drawings and responsive to site supported by clear design approach 30 1 I.1
Development and refinement of drawings and folios 20 2 I.2
Control and execution of industry specific drawing 20 3 P.1
Development and refinement of planting palette demonstrating understanding of community planting 30 4 A.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Required texts

Botany, plant ID

Baker, M., Corringham, R., & Dark, J. (1986). Native plants of the Sydney region. Winmalee, N.S.W.: Three Sisters Productions.

Edmonds, A. D., & Webb, J. B. (1986). Sydney sandstone flora :A beginner's guide to native plants. Kensington, N.S.W.: New South Wales University Press.

Pellow, B. J., Carolin, R. C., & Henwood, M. J. (2009). Flora of the Sydney region :A complete revision (5th ed.). University of Sydney, N.S.W.: Sydney University Press.

Design

Oudolf, P., & Kingsbury, N. (2013). Planting: A new perspective Timber Press.

Rainer, T., & West, C. (2015). Planting in a post-wild world: Designing plant communities for resilient landscapes Timber Press.

Vegetal philosophy

Clément, G., Morris, S., & Tiberghien, G. A. (2015; 2015). The Planetary Garden and Other Writings. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; C©2015: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Clément, G., & Rahm, P. (2006). Environ (ne) ment: approaches for tomorrow; manières d'agir pour demain; published in conjunction with the exhibition" Environ (ne) ment: Manières d'Agir pour Demain-Approaches for Tomorrow," organized by the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montréal, and presented at the CCA from 17 October 2006 to 23 April 2007] ?. Skira.

Gagliano, M., Ryan, J., & Vieira, P. (Eds.). (2017). The Language of Plants; Science, Philosophy, Literature(2017). University of Minnesota Press.

Gandy, M. (2013). Entropy by design: Gilles Clément, Parc Henri Matisse and the Limits to Avant?garde Urbanism. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 37(1), 259-278.

Pascoe, B. (2014). Dark Emu Black Seeds: Agriculture or Accident? Magabala Books.

Wohlleben, P. (2016). The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate—Discoveries from a Secret World Greystone Books.

Recommended texts

Lunney, D, Hutchings, PA, Hochuli, D & Royal Zoological Society of New South, W 2010, The natural history of Sydney, Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Mosman, NSW.

Thompson, P., & Csiro. (2012). Australian planting design. Collingwood, Vic.: CSIRO Publishing.

Turner, KD & Brands, R 2011, Botany for designers: a practical guide for landscape architects and other professionals, W.W. Norton & Company, New York.

References

Practices

Bush Projects

Gilles Clement

Mosbach Paysagistes

Phytostudio

Piet Oudolf

Vogt landscape Architects

Sue Barnsley

Projects

Barangaroo

Bordeaux Botanical Gardens

Highline

Museum Park Louvre Lens

Parc André-Citroën

Parc Matisse

The Battery

Prince Alfred Park

Other resources

Lectures/talks

http://sydney.edu.au/environment-institute/events

HumanNature Series (and others)

http://sydney.edu.au/environment-institute/events/?event_category=talk

Online

https://australianmuseum.net.au

https://andreasensgreen.com.au

https://www.survival.org.au/bush_tucker_survival_guide.php

http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/research/VISmap.htm

http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/topics/land-and-soil/soil-data/soil-maps

http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/vegetation

http://trees.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/map

http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au

https://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au

http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/PlantNet/Euc

https://www.ala.org.au

http://www.bionet.nsw.gov.au

http://avh.ala.org.au/#tab_simpleSearch