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11176 Territory

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level: Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject introduces students to core concepts of 'landscape as territory' as the cumulative result of geophysical, ecological, sociopolitical and cultural conditions. The concept of territory is critical to the practice of landscape architecture which operates across a range of scales and temporal dimensions.

In order to uncover the systems, networks and formation which reveal themselves only at territory scale, mapping is employed as the primary tool of investigation. Cartographic techniques and methods are undertaken in a way that is generative and productive for design. Mapping to design, implies that maps are made to scale. Maps are precise and measured, allowing for deliberate design actions to take place. In this way maps move beyond pure representation.

This subject is designed to assist students to cultivate a literacy in landscape. The theories, skills and preparation undertaken in this subject are vital to the design subject, 11175 Landscape Architecture Studio 3: Grounding.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Develop skills in generative mapping for the purpose of deliberate landscape interventions
2. Develop skills and tools for research, acquiring landscape data, metrics and information? analysis through relevant (GIS), interpreting archival and non-spatial landscape information and knowledge.
3. Development of visually legibility of cartographic products- including correct use of scale, mark making, line work, hierarchy and layout.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of landscape systems and relational networks, with spatial temporal and material qualities.

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject is structured around a series of lab-based practical tutorials and assisted workshops to achieve the course objectives, supported by illustrated lectures over 4 weeks. A range of assessments will be used to ascertain student competency consisting of both group work and individual submissions. Students are expected to attend all sessions, to be prepared and ready to actively participate in allotted activities.

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

UTS staff believe that collaborative peer learning enhances learning. You are encouraged to work in clusters throughout the semester. To facilitate this engagement, one assessment item is a group work submission.

ONLINE COURSEWORK

There are a number of online resources used to support the learning objectives of this subject. Accessing the library with this subject code will direct students to all essential and recommended readings. These will introduce students to the lecture content and will be annotated to highlight important concepts and ideas. All documents are accessible from UTS Online.

FEEDBACK

The subject provides a range of formative feedback strategies.

1. All assessments will be graded in ReView. ReView will be used as a formative feedback mechanism in Assessments 1+ 2.

2. The subject is designed around the progressive development of a final reflective assessment item. Weekly sessions will progressively assist you with the skills to develop and complete this project. It is therefore vital you attend all classes and complete the work (both assessed and otherwise) as outlined in the Subject Handbook to receive useful formative feedback.

Content (topics)

Topics include:

  • Deepened understanding and framing of the Sydney region as a territory with diverse narratives and as palimpsest with multiple layers of information
  • Increased appreciation of landscape and territory through an expanded vocabulary, widened perspectives and perception, exploratory and analytical approaches and tools
  • Introduction to the criticality of broad temporal and scalar underpinnings of landscape architecture practise
  • Introduction to discipline-specific graphical, computing, mapping and other skills and methods.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: AS1 - generate

Intent:

AS1

This assignment is to be completed in pairs.

AS1 asked students develop a series of maps of the territory of Sydney. Choose a condition from the list provided. The condition or phenomena must be specific and a research question must be used to guide the intent of the mapping. The question should be reworked as the mapping inquiry progresses.

Data;

Using a range of sources, data, Shapefiles, ‘paper’ maps, archival materials, journals and books, you are to map in a way that generates new spatial knowledge about the condition or phenomena in the context of Sydney. You will combine multiple sources to make this map and engage geo-spatial and other scientific forms of knowledge, translate these and make them spatial through the process of making the map. This skill of translation is key competency for a landscape architect and will form a major component of the assessment for the map(s).

Time;

Map the same condition or phenomena, through two different temporal situations (i.e. time of day, month of year), making two maps.

Technique;

Your map must use the following at minimum

4 line weights

4 line types

4 hatches

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, C.3, P.2 and P.5

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 50%
Length:

Pairs;

2 x A0 printed landscape maps of the territory of Sydney 1:100,000.

1 x section cutting through the most dynamic vector of your maps

Individual;

1 x zoom in 1:10,000 drawing on A1

1 x 500 piece of writing which unpacks map

1 x series of questions which underpin mapping inquiry

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
The cartographic products demonstrate generative maps for the purpose of deliberate landscape interventions and engage with landscapes complexity 30 4 P.2
Work demonstrates the utilisation of multiple spatial and non-spatial research sources. 30 2 P.5
Drawing are visually legibility and demonstrate the use of including correct use of scale, mark making, line work, hierarchy and layout 30 3 C.3
Demonstrate an understanding of landscape systems and relational networks, with spatial temporal and material qualities 10 1 C.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: AS2 - superimpose

Intent:

AS2

Part (a)

Combined mapping analysis

Taking your map from AS1, pair up and superimpose your map with a student from another pair to create an overlay of two separate systems. Look for moments of intensity, feedback and agitation between the two, make a map of hybridized information which extends further your understanding of Sydney territorial scaled landscape systems.

Relevance;

Choose a map to superimpose which bears a good relevance to your map. You are your new partner will need to present your reasons for paring to your tutor in order to proceeded.

Hierarchy;

Consider what information is included in each set of overlays. Some layers might be turned off, some sent into the background. Consider transparency, line weight and hierarchy

time;

How does the temporal element augment these maps further? How do your account for alternative temporal dimensions between different mapped phenomena?

Part (b).

making the hybrid map

Now individually make a final hybridized map which will consider the overlays from part (a) with. This map must work to speculate on a new set of information that needs to be mapped to answer a question you will set individually.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.2, C.3, P.2 and P.5

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Length:

Individual

Part A:

A3 prints of Assignment 1 with overlays
1 x PDF submission, 1st October

Part B:

1 x hybrid map, A1 landscape
1 x 500 piece of writing which unpacks maps (Part B + C)
1 x series of questions which underpin mappings
PDF + printed submission

Part C:

1 x 1:1 map with aligned or complimentary themes, A2 portrait

PDF + printed submission


Due dates below.

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
The cartographic products demonstrate generative maps for the purpose of deliberate landscape interventions and engage with landscapes complexity 30 1 P.2
Work demonstrates the utilisation of multiple spatial and non-spatial research sources 30 2 P.5
Drawing are visually legibility and demonstrate the use of including correct use of scale, mark making, line work, hierarchy and layout 30 3 C.3
Demonstrate an understanding of landscape systems and relational networks, with spatial temporal and material qualities 10 4 C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

Attendance

The Faculty of DAB expects students to attend at least 80% of the scheduled contact hours for each enrolled subject. Achievement of subject aims is difficult if classes are not attended. Where assessment tasks are to be presented personally in class, attendance is mandatory.

Pursuant to “UTS Rule 3.8.2”, students who do not satisfy attendance requirements, may be refused permission by?the Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.

Late and Incomplete Assignments

Assignments submitted after the due time/date will incur the late penalties listed below. Late submissions will not incur the late penalties listed, only if a formal extension of time has been granted by the Subject Coordinator. This should be approved BEFORE the submission deadline where possible. Work submitted more than 5 working days after the stated submission date, will not be accepted for assessment unless a formal extension of time has been granted by the Subject Coordinator on receipt of a Special Consideration Form.

(Please refer to the “Exemptions and Absence” and “Special Consideration” sections of the DAB Subject Information Book).

Late Penalties

Work submitted up to 5 days* later than the deadline should have an “Extensions and Absence form” attached (with appropriate Doctor’s Certificate or equivalent documentation). Depending on the circumstances, the Subject Coordinator may apply the following penalties:

Up to 1 day late: 10% late reduction **(24 hours from the specified deadline)

Up to 2 days late: 20% late reduction

Up to 3 days late: 30% late reduction

Up to 4 days late: 40% late reduction

Up to 5 days late: 50% late reduction

Over 5 days late: NOT ACCEPTED

The 10% per day penalty is applied to the mark that would have been received if the submission had been on time.

Any work submitted after 5 working days late would need a ‘Special Consideration’ document to be accepted for assessment.

Students cannot expect to receive verbal or written feedback for late work.

* If equipment or software is not available for students to complete the late work, then the Subject Coordinator may decide to exclude weekends from the number of days late in calculating the penalty.?** Where no exact time is specified for a deadline it will be assumed that the deadline is 9am on the date specified.

Required texts

Carter, P 1988, The road to Botany Bay : an exploration of landscape and history, Knopf, New York. [download at: http://site.ebrary.com/lib/utslibrary/detail.action?docID=10440584]

Corner, J. 1999, 'The Agency of Mapping: Speculation, Critique and Invention' in D. E. Cosgrove (Ed.), Mappings: Reaktion.

Corner, J. 2002, 'Representation and Landscape' in S. Swaffield (Ed.), Theory in landscape architecture : a reader. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Corner, J., & MacLean, A. (1996). Taking Measures Across the American Landscape. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.

Cosgrove, DE 1999, Mappings, Reaktion Books, London.

Cosgrove, DE 2004, 'Landscape and Landschaft', GHI Bulletin, vol. 35, no. Fall 2004, pp. 57-71.

Diedrich, Gini, and Raxworthy 2012 Transects In Exposure - Design Research Practice in Landscape Architecture, edited by Jonas and Monacella, 150-165. Melbourne, Melbourne Books

Doherty, G., & Waldheim, C. (2016). Is landscape ...? : essays on the identity of landscape. New York: Routledge.

Gammage, B 2011, The Biggest Estate on Earth: How Aborigines made Australia, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, N.S.W.

Girot, C. 1999, Four Trace Concepts in Landscape Architecture. In J. Corner (Ed.), Recovering Landscape_ Essays in Contemporary Landscape Architecture. New York: Princeton Architectural Press.

Hanna, KC & Culpepper, RB 1998, GIS in site design, John Wiley & Sons.

Hanna, K. C. 1999, GIS for landscape architects. Redlands, Calif.: ESRI Press.

Leary, T, Kwok, A, Khan, B & Ibbetson, P 2010, 'Yuppie bandicoots of inner western Sydney–in hiding or urban renewal?', in The natural history of Sydney. eds., D Lunney, PA Hutchings & D Hochuli, Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Mosman, NSW.

Long, R, Wallis, C & Tate, B 2009, Richard Long : heaven and earth, Tate Pub., London.

Mathur, A., & daCunha, D. 2009. Soak: Mumbai in an estuary. New Delhi: Rupa & co.

McHarg, IL 1967, 'An Ecological Method for Landscape Architecture', Landscape Architecture, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 105-107.

McHarg, IL 1969, Design with Nature, Published for the American Museum of Natural History [by] the Natural History Press, Garden City, N.Y.

O'Rourke, K 2013, Walking and mapping : artists as cartographers, MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachussetts.

Potteiger, M & Purinton, J 1998, Landscape narratives : design practices for telling stories, J. Wiley, New York.

Schama, S 1995, Landscape and memory, A.A. Knopf : Distributed by Random House, New York.

Seddon, G 1979, 'The Genius Loci and the Australian Environment', Landscape Australia, vol. 1, no. 2, p. 66.

Spirn, A. W. (1984). The granite garden : urban nature and human design. New York: Basic Books.

Stilgoe, JR 2015, What is landscape?, MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Winton, T 2015, Island Home: A Landscape Memoir, Penguin Random House Australia, Clayton, Victoria.

***ADD GIS chapter/video to readings

Recommended texts

Allen, Stan. “Field Conditions,” in Points and Lines: Diagrams and Projects for the City, (New York : Princeton Architectural Press, 1999).

Benterrak, K, Muecke, S & Roe, P 1984, Reading the country : introduction to nomadology, Fremantle Arts Centre Press, Fremantle, W.A.

Birmingham, J 1999, Leviathan : the unauthorised biography of Sydney, Knopf, Sydney; New York.

Flannery, T. F. (1997). The future eaters : an ecological history of the Australasian lands and people. Sydney: Sydney : New Holland Publishers.

Flannery, TF 2003, 'Beautiful lies: Population and environment in Australia', Quarterly Essay, vol. 9, pp. 1-73.

Flannery, TF 2000, The birth of Sydney, Grove Press, New York.

Forman, R. T. T., & Godron, M. (1986). Landscape ecology. New York: Wiley.

Hawson, L 2011, 52 suburbs : the search for beauty in the 'burbs, University of New South Wales Press, Coogee, N.S.W.

Lima, M 2011, Visualising Complexity: Mapping Patterns of Information, Princeton Architectural Press, New York.

Lunney, D, Hutchings, PA, Hochuli, D & Royal Zoological Society of New South, W 2010, The natural history of Sydney, Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Mosman, NSW.

Marris, E 2011, Rambunctious garden : saving nature in a post-wild world, Bloomsbury, New York.

Morales, I. (1995). Terrain Vague. In C. C. Davidson & C. Anyone (Eds.), Anyplace. New York, NY; Cambridge, Mass.: Anyone Corp; MIT Press.

Pickett, S. T. A., Cadenasso, M. L., Grove, J. M., Nilon, C. H., Pouyat, R. V., Zipperer, W. C., & Costanza, R. (2001). Urban Ecological Systems: Linking Terrestrial Ecological, Physical, and Socioeconomic Components of Metropolitan Areas1. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 32(1), 127.

Sasaki, Hideo. “Design Process,” in “Thoughts on Education in Landscape Architecture.” LandscapeArchitecture, vol 40 no 4, 1950, pp 158-160.

Steenbergen, Clemens. “Typology”, in Composing Landscapes: Analysis, Typology and Experiments for Design, (Basel: Birkhauser, 2008), p. 266-325.

Swaffield, S. R. (2002). Theory in landscape architecture : a reader. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Tacey, D. J. (1995). Edge of the sacred : transformation in Australia. North Blackburn, Vic., Australia: HarperCollinsPublishers.

Thompson, N., Kastner, J., Paglen, T., Independent Curators, I., Richard, E. P. A. C., Rochester Art, C., . . . Colby College. Museum of, A. (2008). Experimental geography. Brooklyn, New York: Melville House ; Independent Curators International.Tufte, ER 1990, Envisioning information, Graphics Press, Cheshire, Connecticut.

Trieb, Marc (Ed). Modern landscape architecture: a critical review (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1993).

Turnbull, LH 1999, Sydney : biography of a city, Random House Australia, Milsons Point, NSW; New York.

Keith, D, New South, W, Department of, E & Conservation 2004, Ocean shores to desert dunes : the native vegetation of New South Wales and the ACT.

Wood, D 1992, The power of maps, Guilford Press, New York.

Some web addresses of interest:

https://mirrorsydney.wordpress.com/

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-22/south-china-sea-islands-before-and-after/6794076

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-11-13/us-b-52-bomber-over-south-china-sea-contacted-by-chinese-ground/6937476

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/nov/16/bjork-iceland-church-john-grant-sigur-ros

Some fictional works about Sydney/Australia

Carey, P 1988, Oscar & Lucinda, Harper & Row, New York.

White, P 1957, Voss, a novel, Viking Press, New York.

Other resources

Pinterest page | https://www.pinterest.com/UTSLandscape/11176-graphic-examples/