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11119 Landscape Architecture Studio 1: Extended

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 12 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

The architectural design studio provides the creative framework for students to explore the motivations, techniques, contexts, constraints and opportunities that inform design inquiry. Through each project brief, students learn to deploy various mediums, scales and strategies towards the elaboration of design proposals along with clear verbal and visual descriptions of the design intentions and iterative processes that generated them.

The subject provides the introductory studio in the Bachelor of Design in Architecture (C10004) and Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (Honours) (C09079) studio sequence. The subject delivers the framework to learn essential techniques for the production of space as well as important strategies in critical and analytical thinking. The subject introduces students to the fundamental themes of drawing, scale, site, observation, abstraction, precision and translation among others. These themes serve as a common knowledge base critical to the practice of architecture and landscape architecture as well as providing a primer to issues that students continue to face in the sequence of studios ahead.

Students develop an understanding of design thinking using both two- and three-dimensional, analogue and digital exercises, including reading, writing, sketching, mapping, multiple forms of drawing, model building, precedent analysis, direct observation and photogrammetry to build spatial literacy. Rigorous research and iterative design tactics enable students to translate concepts into spatial proposals and situate their proposals within the broader disciplinary context.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Creatively respond to the constraints and opportunities associated with a design brief (concepts, design mediums, scale/s, context/s and spatial ambitions).
2. Use an iterative design process informed by critical reflection.
3. Confidently execute architectural techniques and methods with appropriate precision and care.
4. Engage with and contribute generously to a studio culture that enhances peer-learning and collective motivation through processes of collaboration, reflection and debate.
5. Clearly communicate, both visually and verbally, the intentions and design processes that have generated a spatial proposal.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Work cooperatively and productively as part of a team. (C.1)
  • Communicate ideas professionally. (C.2)
  • Create designs that respond to their context in formally or conceptually innovative ways. (I.1)
  • Advance ideas through an exploratory and iterative design process. (I.2)
  • Develop advanced skills for the production, presentation and documentation of work. (P.1)
  • Generate solutions to complex problems through an exploratory and iterative design process. (P.2)

Teaching and learning strategies

Studio

Design studios are a distinctive component of your education. The term ‘studio’ refers to a particular type of physical space, a distinct approach to teaching and learning, and a particular set of working practices. These intersect to produce an environment in which making, experimentation, collaboration, discussion and display are highly valued.

The studio will convene twice a week during the teaching session. This will be supplemented by a final review during assessment week 1. Each teaching day includes a 2 hour lecture and 3 hours in studio.

Structure

The subject is structured around three assessment tasks, each containing a series of design modules. Each module is defined by specified design questions, processes and deliverables outlined in individual module briefs. Lectures are used to introduce each module and provide guidance on relevant techniques, theory and precedent. Module specific lectures are to be complemented by a general lecture series, introducing students to key architectural ideas, terms and theories. The content of these lectures will form the basis of discussions in studio.

Participation

Supervised studio hours serve as the time to progress, discuss and review work under guidance from the subject’s teaching team. Design is an inherently social activity centred on the use of visual and verbal forms of communication. The success of studio is dependant on positive and constructive participation from all. Students will be expected to comment on their own work, the work of fellow students and the projects (realised and speculative) of accomplished designers, such as those shown in lectures. Students are to come to each studio session ready to participate in an assessment tasks planned activities. The program in this document provides an overview of each studio session. This included information about preparatory tasks, materials and deliverables (in progress and final).

Preparation

There will be times throughout the session when students will be asked to undertake additional preparatory activities, beyond the scope of an assessment task. These are activities are designed to expand a students understanding of architectural thinking, practice and culture. Activities may involve reading an assigned text, independently visiting a project in Sydney (and beyond), or undertaking research in the UTS library. Beyond this, it is expected that students will demonstrate self-motivation through expansive exploration of cultural production from within and beyond their discipline as well as continually expanding their own set of skills and production techniques. Although the outcomes of these activities may not be explicitly marked, if executed properly, they will positively contribute to a student’s academic development and improve the quality of work produced for the subject’s assessment tasks.

Feedback & Assessment

Students will receive formative feedback for each module. Formative feedback is provided during the learning process, when work for an assessment task is in production. It takes the form of comments, suggestions and directions, given in class to help students refine and improve their work prior to submission. For this to occur students need to respond constructively to the feedback provided. This involves critically reflecting on advice given and, where necessary, altering their approach.

It will typically be provided verbally by the subject's teaching staff, but will also, on occasion, be provided by other students. It is delivered informally, either in conversation during a tutorial or in the course of discussion at the scale of the whole class. Students should keep a written record of the feedback they receive. If a student is confused about a particular aspect of their feedback they should seek clarification from the teaching team. Ideally this should be done when feedback is being delivered. Alternatively, clarification can be sought in person at the end of class or after class via email.

Each of the three formal assessment tasks will conclude with a student being assigned a grade and written summative feedback. Summative feedback focuses on assessment outcomes. It is used to indicate how successfully a student has performed in terms of specific assessment criteria. It is provided in written form for all assessed work. It is published along with indicative grades online at UTS REVIEW. The content of summative feedback serves a number of purposes. It is intended to provide an explanation for the grade issued, reflecting on the quality of the work submitted and the student’s performance leading up to submission. Students are also provided with strategies for improving aspects warranting attention, or the further advancement of identified strengths. Students should direct any queries about summative feedback to the subject deliverer. In the first instance this should be done by email.

Content (topics)

The content of this subject includes a series of experimental project-based exercises. These projects can take the format of short weekly conceptual design exercises or longer, more conventional projects. The projects and lectures are focused on structures and material as it pertains to architectural design, performance and function at a range of scales. Two and three dimensional representational techniques are developed, including oral and written communication skills. Students will work with critical arguments through the production of documents relevant to the project briefs throughout the session.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Design Modules, Part 1

Intent:

This task aims to introduce students to the first principles of design practice. It initiates the building of foundational knowledge and skills relevant to both landscape architecture and architecture through the completion of a series of design modules. Each module focuses on different scales and combines a strategically constrained project with specific mediums of enquiry (reading/writing; physical modelling; scanning).

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, C.2, I.1, P.1 and P.2

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
The project demonstrates an understanding of the key aims behind the brief and has successfully addressed each of them. In the best cases the project will have proven inventive and will exceed the outlined objectives. 20 1 I.1
Follows an iterative design process where design intent is clear and each test builds upon lessons from the previous. The existence of errors, dead-ends or aborted tests is a positive indicator so long as appropriately evaluated and exceeded in subsequent tests. 30 2 P.2
Work demonstrates an appropriate amount of care, effort, precision and ambition for each task. It is important to note that many tasks benefit from rapid-fire testing (sketches, sketch-models) which may be rough. Successful tests should be followed by versions of increasing refinement. 20 3 P.1
Contributes to peer-learning, studio culture and in-class discussion through being attentive, engaged and positive. 10 4 C.1
The work and the intentions and processes that lead to it are clearly visually and verbally described. 20 5 C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Design Modules, Part 2

Intent:

This task aims to further develop foundational knowledge and skills relevant to both landscape architecture and architecture through the completion of a series of design modules of increased complexity. Here again, each pair a strategically constrained project at a different scale with a specific medium or mediums (ground-truthing, photography, digital and physical modelling).

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, C.2, I.1, P.1 and P.2

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
The project demonstrates an understanding of the key aims behind the brief and has successfully addressed each of them. In the best cases the project will have proven inventive and will exceed the outlined objectives. 20 1 I.1
Follows an iterative design process where design intent is clear and each test builds upon lessons from the previous. The existence of errors, dead-ends or aborted tests is a positive indicator so long as appropriately evaluated and exceeded in subsequent tests. 30 2 P.2
Work demonstrates an appropriate amount of care, effort, precision and ambition for each task. It is important to note that many tasks benefit from rapid-fire testing (sketches, sketch-models) which may be rough. Successful tests should be followed by versions of increasing refinement. 30 3 P.1
Contributes to peer-learning, studio culture and in-class discussion through being attentive, engaged and positive. 10 4 C.1
The work and the intentions and processes that lead to it are clearly visually and verbally described. Relevant precedents have been found, responded to and their contribution is explained. The work is contextualised. 20 5 C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Portoflio + Exhibition

Intent:

This task asks students to look back on the work previously produced and to edit, re-present and, for selected modules, further develop their projects proposals. The venues for the edited work are the collectively produced end-of-semester exhibition and individual portfolios (which will also be exhibited).

Students will be responsible for critically selecting and refining those modules that most interest them and which will best demonstrate their proficiency. This will be complemented by a group task in which students collaborate on the design and fabrication of an exhibition space that includes provision for reading portfolios and viewing a select body of developed materials.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

2 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.2 and P.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 65%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
The selected design modules have been revisited, advanced and improved in response to tutor and peer feedback, self-assessment and increased knowledge and skill. The materials are carefully incorporated into the exhibition and portfolio.. 40 2 I.2
Thematics addressed by the subjectís design modules are identified and emphasised through a considered approach to organisation and formatting. The document reads coherently, aided by the inclusion of titles, annotation and written reflection. 30 5 P.1
The exhibition's proposition creatively explores the relationship between portfolios, exhibited material and the audience. The spatial design leverages techniques developed through the semesterís design modules. Care and precision has informed the process of making and assembly. 30 5 P.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

Attendance

The Faculty of DAB expects students to attend at least 80% of the scheduled contact hours for each enrolled subject.

Achievement of subject aims is difficult if classes are not attended. Where assessment tasks are to be presented personally in class, attendance is mandatory.

Pursuant to “UTS Rule 3.8.2”, students who do not satisfy attendance requirements, may be refused permission by the

Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.

Qwickly Attendance will be used to keep a record of lecture attendance. Students are required to 'check-in' online during the first 10 minutes of each lecture.

Students who are unable to attend for personal reasons (e.g. sickness) are to notify the subject's coordinators by email on the day of absence.

Late and Incomplete Assignments

Assignments submitted after the due time/date will incur the late penalties listed below unless a formal extension of time has been granted by the Subject Coordinator. This should be approved BEFORE the submission deadline where possible. Work submitted more than 5 working days after the stated submission date, will not be accepted for assessment unless a formal extension of time has been granted by the Subject Coordinator on receipt of a Special Consideration Form. (Please refer to the “Exemptions and Absence” and “Special Consideration” sections of the DAB Subject Information Book).

Work submitted up to 5 days* later than the deadline should have an “Extensions and Absence form” attached (with appropriate Doctor’s Certificate or equivalent documentation). Depending on the circumstances, the Subject Coordinator may apply the following penalties:

Up to 1 day late: 10% late reduction **(24 hours from the specified deadline)

Up to 2 days late: 20% late reduction

Up to 3 days late: 30% late reduction

Up to 4 days late: 40% late reduction

Up to 5 days late: 50% late reduction

Over 5 days late: NOT ACCEPTED

• The 10% per day penalty is applied to the mark that would have been received if the submission had been on time.

• Any work submitted after 5 working days late would need a ‘Special Consideration’ document to be accepted for

assessment.

• Students cannot expect to receive verbal or written feedback for work submitted more than 5 days late.

* If equipment or software is not available for students to complete the late work, then the Subject Coordinator may

decide to exclude weekends from the number of days late in calculating the penalty.

** Where no exact time is specified for a deadline it will be assumed that the deadline is 9am on the date specified.

Required texts

Where relevant reading lists will be provided with each module brief.